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Mental disorder among prisoners toward an epidemiologic inventory by Nathaniel J. Pallone

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Published by Transaction Publishers in New Brunswick, N.J. (U.S.A.) .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States.,
  • United States

Subjects:

  • Mentally ill offenders -- United States.,
  • Mental illness -- United States -- Epidemiology.,
  • Violence -- United States -- Etiology.,
  • Prisoners -- Mental health services -- United States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [151]-178) and index.

StatementNathaniel J. Pallone.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRC451.4.P68 P34 1990
The Physical Object
Pagination184 p. :
Number of Pages184
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1858588M
ISBN 100887383831
LC Control Number90011119

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  When this book was first published, the incidence of mental disorder among prisoners was nearly four times greater than among comparable groups in the general population in part because prisoners are disproportionately drawn from demographic groups with a high incidence of mental disorder—nonwhite and from lower socioeconomic : Nathaniel Pallone.   Prison Madness signals a growing movement intent on exposing current prison policies and the treatment of mentally disordered prisoners as cruel and unusual punishment. A Disturbing and Shocking Exposé-A Passionate Cry for by:   Some 70 years later, the journalist Alisa Roth has written a chilling book that argues that American jails and prisons have become de facto warehouses for the mentally ill. mental disorder were based on criteria specified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edi-tion (DSM-IV). More than two-fifths of State prisoners (43%) and more than half of jail inmates (54%) reported symptoms that met the criteria for mania. About 23% of State prisoners and 30% of jail inmates.

Prisoners with mental health disorders are disproportionately involved in prison infractions and violent incidents, 41, 42 and are more likely to be charged with violating prison rules than other prisoners, and twice as likely to be injured in a fight. 43 Mentally disordered offenders with a history of violence are at even greater risk. Among those who had ever been told they had a mental disorder, the largest percentage of prisoners (24%) and jail inmates (31%) reported they had a major depressive disorder. More prisoners (14%) and jail inmates (26%) met the threshold for SPD in the .   Understanding mental health among fathers in jail and prison, in particular, is especially important because fathers’ incarceration—and their mental health—has consequences for the health and well-being of families and children (James & Glaze, ; Meadows, McLanahan, & Brooks-Gunn, ; Turney, a; Wildeman & Muller, ; Wildeman.   “Jails and prisons are among the least therapeutic environments in the world,” says Alisa Roth, who toured facilities across the country for her recent book, Insane: America’s Criminal Treatment .

  Indeed, three reviews included a total of only ten studies in general prison populations.2, 3, 4 More reliable estimates of the prevalence rates of serious mental disorders in prisoners, such as psychotic illnesses, major depression, and antisocial personality disorder should help inform public policy and prison health services. We have done a.   Fazel, S. & Danesh, J. () Serious mental disorder in prisoners: a systematic review of 62 surveys. Lancet, , – Cited by:   Epidemiological studies conducted among prisoners have shown a high prevalence of psychiatric morbidity. The magnitude of severe mental disorder was five to ten times higher among prisoners compared to general population. As important as correctional facilities are for correctional purposes, the institutions could be destructive too. Of the 4 million prisoners released each year, 23 percent have suffered from major depressive disorder. Due to resource shortages, many go without adequate treatment while in prison.